What would happen if you left your family for over eight years, but you only aged a year-and-a-half?

Such is the plight of astronaut Hugh Goodwin in Skies of Tomorrow. As the most decorated astronaut at the International Space Exploration Department, it falls to Hugh to captain a mission to see if Osiris is a planet capable of sustaining human life since the Earth’s rotation is slowing and violent storms and devastating earthquakes are becoming more common.

Knowing that he will be gone for over eight years gives Hugh second thoughts, since he has a wife and two young children, but his sense of duty forces him to agree to the mission. There’s something else that makes the mission intimidating, however: time dilation. The faster one moves through space, the slower time is relative to that person and Hugh and his team will be the first to experience it.

Going at nearly the speed of light, Hugh must prepare himself for the fact that his four-year-old daughter, Emma, will be thirteen when he returns and that his son, Stephen, will be in college. Due to stasis pods, the journey will only feel like several months, but when Hugh returns, his wife Angela will be ten years older than him and he will look nearly the same as when he left.

Skies of Tomorrow is about a trip to the stars, but more so, it’s about how a man returns to a world that has become alien to him and how he must find his place in it once more despite all that’s changed. Interpersonal relationships between family are explored and how one man’s guilt can be felt by all across time and star systems.