This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1813 edition. Excerpt: ... by night with light matter and stitched them up close; and a great rain happening to fall that night, was the reason why all their preparations for ferrying over passed undiscovered; the noise of the storm, with the violence of the thunder and lightning, hindered the clashing of their armour, and the voices of the commanding-officers, from being heard. Many of the vessels which had been before taken to pieces were conveyed hither, and put together again in the wood unperceived by the enemy, and, among the rest, those of thirty oars, The winds then being hushed, and the rain ceasing a little before daylights many of his foot and horseasboth the hides and ships could carry, passed secretly over into the island that they might not be discovered by the guards which Porus had placed upon the bank before they had passed through the island, and were even ready to ascend the bank itself. CHAP. XIII.—Alexander himself followed in a vessel of thirty oars, and with him were Ptolemy, Perdiccas, and Lysimachus, three & of his body guards; besides Seleucus, one of his favourites, who reigned as king after him, and half of the targeteers: the rest were conveyed ever in other vessels of the same burden. As soon as the army had passed through the island, they approached the bank in sight of the enemy's out-guards, who rode away with all imaginable expedition to carry the news to Porus. In the mean while, Alexander, who first ascended the bank, took care to draw up those who ferried over in vessels, and the horse which came with them, and to march before them in order of battle; but, by their want of knowledge of the country, they happened to enter into a dangerous and unsafe place: it was another island much larger than the former, which seemed...