This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XC. HOW THE ENGLISH RETURNED BOULOGNE TO THE KING OF FRANCE. HOW the Protector was blamed for the loss of the forts has already been told, and certainly, if he had taken as much care as the good King Henry VIII., Boulogne would not have been surrendered, as will be related here. When the King of France learnt the few men that guarded the forts, he sent some eight thousand troops, who first took St. Jean de Eus, three leagues from Boulogne, on the Calais road, and afterwards captured the " Old Man," as the English called it, and subsequently the other fort which was on the slope opposite Boulogne. The French also had on the other side of the water another fort which they had erected, so that no supplies could now reach Boulogne. The French did not effect much damage, but as the English saw they could not hold out, they decided to make peace; and the French, knowing that if they took the place by force, it would cost many lives and much money, determined to offer an indemnity, and at last agreed to give four thousand crowns, on condition, however, that the English were not to destroy any edifice they had constructed. Truly the English might write a lament on Boulogne, and say, " Thouhadst better not been founded," for certainly, without any contradiction, it cost the King over six millions in gold, besides being the ruin of his kingdom for years, and God knows the loss of how many lives. And yet, after all, by carelessness and bad management, they gave it up for the sum mentioned. Truly the English lost much on the day that the valiant King Henry VIII. died, and great evil comes, and will come to them from having sown such discord amongst their governors; and I only hope to God that King Edward will soon be able to govern. He was a...