Theodore Francis Powys was a British writer, a younger brother of John Cowper Powys.

Born to a clergyman father of Welsh origin, T. F. Powys spent most of his life in the West Country, writing mostly while living at East Chaldon in Dorset. Several of his brothers and sisters, including Llewelyn Powys and Philippa Powys, distinguished themselves in artistic circles. Theodore was deeply, if unconventionally, religious and was the author of several novels and many short stories.

Powys was a man who rarely left home or travelled in a car, who claimed to love monotony, and who 'never gave so much as a sunflower-seed for the busy, practical life'.

He ran his own farm, White House Farm at Sweffling, Suffolk, before "retiring" to Dorset, determined to write. In 1904, he settled in East Chaldon, and there he remained until 1940, when the war drove him inland to Mappowder. In 1905, he married Violet Rosalie Dodds, a local girl; they had two sons and an adopted daughter.

Powys's unorthodox version of Christianity reveals strands of mysticism, quietism, and pantheism, but the major influence upon him was the Bible, and he claimed that Religion 'is the only subject I know anything about'. Sometimes savage, often lyrical, his novels and stories explore universal themes of Love, Death, Good and Evil within the microcosm of the rural world. In spite of the apparent realism of his settings, Powys is a symbolist and allegorist.